Is workplace pension worth it? Pension in the workplace explained.


Things can get tricky for some people after retirement when they do not have a source of earnings. And a pension in the workplace is a savings scheme to help employees enjoy the later years of their life without compromising their standard of living. Read on to learn about workplace pensions, their benefits, eligibility, and more.


Contents


What is a workplace pension?

How does a workplace pension work?

What are different workplace pensions?

Who is entitled to a workplace pension?

What is pension tax relief?

Changing jobs and workplace pensions

workplace pension vs private pension

FAQ


What is a workplace pension?

Resource

https://www.nerdwallet.com/uk/pensions/workplace-pensions-explained/


A pension is a form of saving you can use when you retire and do not have an earning source. The employer arranges workplace pensions, and a workplace pension law requires most employers to automatically enroll their workers into workplace pension schemes to ensure workers get a pension in the workplace.


How does a workplace pension work?

Resource

https://www.standardlife.co.uk/pensions/guides/what-is-workplace-pension

A pension in the workplace scheme works by deducting a percentage of your pay as contributions directly from your wages. When you join a new company, you will be informed about the percentage of your salary that will be contributed to your workplace pension. In most cases, your employer will also add money for pension for workers. In some workplace pension schemes, the government also makes payments.


What are different workplace pensions?


Resource

https://www.pensionbee.com/pensions-explained/pension-types/what-is-a-workplace-pension


The two main types of pensions for workers are

  • Defined contribution pensions or money purchase schemes

  • Defined benefit pensions or final salary pensions


Defined contribution pensions


A defined contribution pension is a workplace pension like a tax-friendly savings account. This scheme pays you a retirement income based on the amount you have contributed to the pension. The money in your pension in the workplace is invested into funds, and the amount you receive

pension plan on retirement will depend on the performance of this fund. The employer and the employee get tax relief on the contributions made in this pension scheme at the workplace. When setting a workplace pension for workers, the employer can choose from an individual trust pension scheme, a master trust pension scheme, a group personal pension, and many others. You can typically take money from this pension scheme from age 55.


Defined benefit pensions


Although very rare nowadays, a defined benefit pension is a workplace pension given mainly by big or public sector companies. This pension is linked to your salary, so it increases as your working salary increases. The pension scheme is a workplace pension that pays you a retirement income based on your salary and the years you have worked for the company.


Who is entitled to a workplace pension?


Resource

https://www.ageuk.org.uk/information-advice/money-legal/pensions/workplace-pensions/


Regarding workplace pension rules in the UK, all employers must provide a workplace pension scheme and enroll their employees into their pension scheme automatically. An employee aged between 22 and State Pension age, earns at least £10,000 per year and who works in the UK is eligible for a pension for workers.

In most cases, your employer does not have to automatically enroll you if you do not meet the criteria mentioned above. One can opt out of the workplace pensions if they want to after informing their employer. However, if money is not an issue, it is an excellent decision to contribute to a workplace pension scheme, as it will be beneficial in the future.


What is pension tax relief?


Resource

https://www.hsbc.co.uk/retirement/what-is-a-workplace-pension/

Some pension schemes allow the money that you would normally pay to the government to go towards your pension instead, which is known as pension tax relief. Thus, a good pension scheme allows the employee and employer to reduce the tax they pay to the government as the idea is to not be taxed on money paid into your pension. However, there is a limit on the tax relief one can get on the contributions made to the pension scheme, therefore, you should decide on your contribution only after discussing it with HR.


One must make a minimum of 8% contribution towards their pension fund out of which 5% is deducted from the salary and 3% is made up of your employer's contributions and tax relief.


Changing jobs and workplace pensions


Resource

https://www.gov.uk/workplace-pensions/changing-jobs-and-taking-leave


Whether you change jobs or stop contributing money to your pension funds, the money still belongs to you, and you get it when you reach the scheme's pension age. When you change jobs, you can join the pension scheme of your new employer or join the two schemes (this is not possible in all the schemes). This is because there is no limit to the amount you can put in your pension schemes.


If you are getting paid during your maternity leave or any other leave, you and your employer will continue to make pension contributions.


In case of the passing of the employee while still in service, the pension funds get passed to their beneficiaries. You should constantly update your pension scheme documents, so your pension pot is inherited by someone you want in the event of your death.


Workplace pension vs. Private pension


Resource

https://www.wealthify.com/blog/private-pension-vs-workplace-pension


Private pensions are like workplace pensions; however, instead of being set up by your employer like a workplace pension, they are set up by you.


FAQ


Are workplace pensions worth it?


Like any other saving scheme, workplace pensions are beneficial for most people as they help people enjoy their retirement without worry. The good part about pension for workers is that it is not only you who contributes to your pension pot, but your employer also contributes, and you also get the tax benefits. So, if you have money, you should contribute to your workplace pensions.


Is workplace pension compulsory?


The UK law requires all employers to provide a workplace pension scheme to the workers. However, an employee can choose to opt out of this scheme.


How much workplace pension will I get?


The workplace pension you will get will depend on the contributions you and your employers have made and the performance of your investments.


How much workplace pension do I pay?


In most cases, the contribution in the pension pit is 8%, where the employer puts around 3%, and the employee puts 5%.


 

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